IRS at 100 PDF Print E-mail

 

How Income Taxation Built the Middle Class

Across the U.S., new progressive state legislative majorities endorsed the income tax amendment in 1910 and 1912.  Early in 1913, final ratification gave Congress a green light to add an income tax to the tax code. Eight months later Congress passed a new revenue act that featured a modest income tax of up to 7 percent on income higher than $4,000, the equivalent of $94,000 today.

john buenker and sam pizzigatiJohn Buenker and Sam Pizzigati explain that during the mid-20th century, a progressive income tax with steeply graduated tax rates raised the revenue that payed for the new programs and services that opened doors into middle-class life.  These steeply graduated rates sent the message that American society frowned on incomes that towered too high.  As a result of the progressive income tax, the U.S. became the first mass middle-class nation in the history of the world where the majority did not live in poverty.  In contrast, tax reductions in recent decades have defunded infrastructure maintenance and development as well as job training and education; eroded middle class incomes and Americans' quality of life, and increased poverty in the U.S.


Read John Buenker and Sam Pizzigati's article:  IRS at 100: How income taxation built the middle class


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MN's Leading Election System

With Secretary of State Steve Simon

 

steve simon

 

Listen to Secretary of State Steve Simon's excellent presentation on MN's outstanding election system emulated by many other states at the Think Again Brooklyns forum January 19, 2016.  Secretary Simon includes ways in which it can be improved, and he explains why it is important to vote.  He concludes with a quote from a tee shirt:  "Failure to vote is not an act of rebellion.  It is an act of surrender."

Get details on how to vote at http://mnvotes.org

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How Oregon Became the Easiest Place to Vote in the US

By Lornet Turnbull
YES! Magazine
October 8, 2016

 


In January, Oregon became the first state in the country to begin automatically registering eligible citizens to vote when they obtain or renew their driver's licenses or state IDs, completely shifting the burden of voter registration from the individual to the government. 

Read the Article

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