MN's Electoral Process: Diverse Audience, Excellent Speakers PDF Print E-mail

 

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       MN's electoral process gives all citizens a chance to participate in choosing a party's
       candidates and public policies. Above:  Writing, discussing, and voting on a public policy.

 

joy marsh stephensForum Attendee Joy Marsh Stephens posted in MN's Electoral Process: Minority Influence in 2014
   
9:20pm Jan 16

"If you missed it then you REALLY missed something special. Hats off to all the organizations who sponsored this really valuable educational opportunity. Thanks as well to the many speakers who took time to share their knowledge and empower a whole new base of constituents. I'm glad I was there along with so many of my neighbors."

Points Shared by the Speakers


benjamin kruseBenjamin Kruse opened the forum with an explanation of caucuses as the starting place for MN's Electoral Process.  At the caucuses, precinct chairs and vice chairs are elected, delegates to the Senate District Convention selected, and Resolutions proposed for the Party Platforms.  At the Senate District Convention, candidates for state legislative offices, this year MN Representatives, are endorsed and delegates and alternates elected for the Congressional District and State Conventions.  If you don't want to run to be delegate yourself, you can cast your vote for someone who plans to vote for the same candidates you prefer.

patricia torres raySenator Patricia Torres Ray told the diverse audience that a Caucus was an easy way to become involved in a political party.  It is a way for people to have a big influence because the number of participants tends to be small.  The people who participate become like an extended family.  Senator Torres Ray noted that most of the legislation she proposes has been suggested by her constituents, adding that it is the public that leads on legislation.  Legislators usually support legislation when the public rallies behind it.

 

sarah walkerSarah Walker, President of the Coalition for Impartial Justice, spoke on the large number of black men, one in five, who are disenfranchised in Minnesota.  Due to laws promoted by the American Legislative Exchange Council, many more people were convicted of felonies in states throughout the nation in the last 30 years.  Most of these convictions are for drug use and do not involve violence.  While drug use is similar in black and white communities, stop and search policies in black neighborhoods have resulted in a far higher rate of arrest for black men. Drug arrest policies carried out since the 1980's have resulted in the U.S. having the highest rate of incarceration of any nation in the world. 

MN is one of the states lowest in incarceration, but one of the highest in probation and parole.  Currently people on probation and parole are not allowed to vote.  Ms. Walker stated that the Second Chance Coalition is advocating restoring the right to vote to people convicted of a felony once they complete their prison sentence.  Restoring the right to vote encourages people to take on the responsibilities of citizenship and helps them to become reintegrated into the community. 

 

devin monteroDevin Montero, Brooklyn Park City Clerk, spoke on the important role of election judges, and the extra help that bilingual judges contribute to elections.  He also brought one of the new voting machines and showed how the machine works.

 

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MN's Leading Election System

With Secretary of State Steve Simon

 

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Listen to Secretary of State Steve Simon's excellent presentation on MN's outstanding election system emulated by many other states at the Think Again Brooklyns forum January 19, 2016.  Secretary Simon includes ways in which it can be improved, and he explains why it is important to vote.  He concludes with a quote from a tee shirt:  "Failure to vote is not an act of rebellion.  It is an act of surrender."

Get details on how to vote at http://mnvotes.org

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How Oregon Became the Easiest Place to Vote in the US

By Lornet Turnbull
YES! Magazine
October 8, 2016

 


In January, Oregon became the first state in the country to begin automatically registering eligible citizens to vote when they obtain or renew their driver's licenses or state IDs, completely shifting the burden of voter registration from the individual to the government. 

Read the Article

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